#RealLifeWonderWoman Revisited–Catherine Brennan

If this week’s #RealLifeWonderWoman looks familiar to you, that may be because you’ve seen her here before. Right here, on my blog, back in December of 2019. I featured Catherine Brennan then, as she was launching her first book, So Now What? A Guide for People Who Feel Stuck. CLICK HERE to see my original interview with Catherine Since then,

#RealLifeWonderWoman — Meet Jacey Spaeth

Today’s #RealLifeWonderWoman and I have a few fun things in common. We both attend (or in my case attended, past tense) the University of North Dakota, both are members of Kappa Alpha Theta fraternity for women, and both work to empower people (especially women) to live their fullest lives. And yes, we both appreciate a pan of piping hot pizza

Self-care during a pandemic: How do you recharge?

Clients, employees, kids, commitments—these vital parts of daily life bring both satisfaction and challenges. But together they can suck your energy. Add the short, dark days of a long winter along with the extra challenges of living during a pandemic, and, like that Chevy you drove in college, you may find yourself needing a jump-start. How can you avoid burnout

A Pledge of Resilience

Lately, the word “resilient” keeps popping up in conversation and in my social media feeds. Apparently, it is a hot topic across generations and across industries. I hear it from concerned parents asking how they can help their kids be more resilient. I hear it from young women who feel like they are crushed by adversity, and wanting guidance. I

#RealLifeWonderWoman — Meet Sophie Riegel

I learned of today’s #RealLifeWonderWoman from a colleague who told me, “you simply have to meet her!” She’s an author, speaker, mental health advocate, student and dog rescuer. She radiates both resilience and gratitude. And by the way, she’s accomplished all of this (and so much more!) before her nineteenth birthday. Her book is called Don’t Tell Me To Relax!: One

Leaning Into The Curves

This is not how it’s supposed to be, I thought as my husband and I packed up our daughter’s belongings from her dorm room. I choked back tears as I boxed up her barely used Keurig and like-new text books, her fluffy white comforter and coordinating desk lamp. These same items—so full of promise and possibility when we helped her